Publications: Peer-reviewed journal articles (by staff)

Application of solid phase adsorption toxin tracking (SPATT) devices for the field detection of Gambierdiscus toxins

  • Roué M, Darius HT, Viallon J, Ung A, Gatti C,
  • Harwood DT,
  • and Chinain M
1 January, 2018
CITATION

Roué M, Darius HT, Viallon J, Ung A, Gatti C, Harwood DT, Chinain M 2018. Application of solid phase adsorption toxin tracking (SPATT) devices for the field detection of Gambierdiscus toxins. Harmful Algae 71: 40-49.

DOI link here

ABSTRACT

Ciguatera fish poisoning is a food-borne illness caused by the consumption of seafood contaminated with ciguatoxins (CTXs) produced by dinoflagellates in the Gambierdiscus genus. Since most surveillance programs currently rely on the survey of Gambierdiscus cell densities and species composition, supplementary toxin-based methods allowing the time- and spatially integrated sampling of toxins in ciguateric environments are needed for a more reliable assessment and management of the risks associated with Gambierdiscus proliferation. Solid Phase Adsorption Toxin Tracking (SPATT) filters use porous synthetic resins capable of adsorbing toxins directly from the water column. To assess the ability of these passive monitoring devices to retain Gambierdiscus toxins, SPATT bags filled with 10 g of HP20 resin were deployed for 48 h in two French Polynesian locations at high (Nuku Hiva Island) vs. low to moderate (Kaukura Atoll) risk of ciguatera. CTXs could be detected in SPATT bags extracts from Nuku Hiva Island, as assessed by the mouse neuroblastoma cell-based assay (CBA-N2a) and liquid chromatography – tandem mass spectrometry (LC–MS/MS) analyses. Results of in vitro experiments suggest that the saturation limit of CTXs on HP20 resin, for a deployment time of 48 h, is ≃ 55 ng P-CTX-3C equiv. g−1 resin. Despite the non detection of maitotoxin (MTX), LC–MS/MS analyses showed that two other compounds also produced by Gambierdiscus species were retained on SPATT bags, i.e. iso-P-CTX-3B/C and a putative MTX analogue, known as MTX-3. This study, the first to demonstrate the suitability of SPATT technology for the in situ monitoring of Gambierdiscus toxins, highlights the potential application of this tool for routine ciguatera risk assessment and management programs.