Publications: Peer-reviewed journal articles (by staff)

The effects of gonadotropin-releasing hormone analog on yellowtail kingfish Seriola lalandi (Valenciennes, 1833) spawning and egg quality

  • Setiawan AN, Muncaster S, Pether S, King A, Irvine GW, Lokman PM,
  • and Symonds JE
30 November, 2016
CITATION

Setiawan AN, Muncaster S, Pether S, King A, Irvine GW, Lokman PM, Symonds JE 2016. The effects of gonadotropin-releasing hormone analog on yellowtail kingfish Seriola lalandi (Valenciennes, 1833) spawning and egg quality. Aquaculture Reports 4: 1-9.

DOI link here

ABSTRACT

Communal spawning behaviour in marine aquaculture species often results in a few individuals contributing disproportionate amounts of gametes. This can lead to a reduction in genetic variability and increases the risk of inbreeding among successive generations. Therefore, long term sustainability of captive breeding programmes for such species partly depends upon maintaining a sufficiently high proportion of parents contributing high quality gametes during spawning. The current study was conducted to evaluate if the use of slow-release gonadotropin-releasing hormone analog (GnRHa) implants could increase the number of females spawning high quality gametes, and thus increase genetic variation in a captive population of yellowtail kingfish Seriola lalandi (Valenciennes, 1833). Broodstock fish received implants with or without 500 μg of GnRHa during the spawning season. GnRHa treatment was associated with a higher proportion of females contributing to spawning. However, compared to eggs from non-GnRHa-treated broodstock, GnRHa significantly decreased the floating rate, fertilisation rate, number of viable eggs and egg oil globule diameter. Overall, the use of slow-release GnRHa implants is a useful tool to increase parental contribution to spawning, but this benefit must be carefully balanced against lower egg quality.